Entry 12 – Door Seals, Trim and Wood

Wood Trim

After what seems like months since I have worked on “Stinky,” I was able to devote most of a Saturday and Sunday to the continuing process of stripping the interior of the MKII. Pulling (tacks, nails and staples) and scraping are not two of my favorite jobs in car restoration, but they are essential parts of the process.

My first task early Saturday morning was to remove the capping assembly of the RH Cant Rail, or as I refer to it, “the wood trim over the passenger door.” There is a small Chrome End Finishersecured to the wood with one slotted screw. The book said the wood piece was fastened with three screws through the metal door frame, but mine had five?

Door Capping Reverse Side

Door Capping Reverse Side

RH Front Door Capping

RH Front Door Capping

Screw Through Metal Into Wood

Screw Through Metal Into Wood

I then removed the Screen Rail Capping Assembly – the wood dash top. The wood was secured at to two brackets on either side of the dash. Washers were used as spacers to level the dash top. The RH side had a flat washer between the bracket and the wood, then two flat washers with a nut. The left side had three flat washers above the bracket, then the nut.

LH Screen Rail Capping

LH Screen Rail Capping

RH Screen Rail Capping

RH Screen Rail Capping

Capping Underside

Capping Underside

Screen Rail Capping Top

Screen Rail Capping Top

The Capping for the RH “A” Post was the next piece of trim to be removed. The parts manual indicates that the “A” post wood is fastened to the post with two screws: DAC.604/12C lower and DAZ.404/12C upper with cup washers. Mine only had the lower screws? The lower screw is hidden by the screen rail, wood dash top, hence its removal first in the sequence.

"A" Post Capping Upperside

“A” Post Capping Upperside

RH "A" Post Capping

RH “A” Post Capping

There is a Chrome Finisher Plate on the exterior of the “A” posts. It is held in place by a series of five tabs that are bent over the “A” post. The upper and lower tabs have holes for screws, but no screws were used.

Securing Tabs Folder Over "A" Post

Securing Tabs Folder Over “A” Post

Chrome Finisher Upperside

Chrome Finisher Upperside

Chrome Finisher Underside

Chrome Finisher Underside

I then removed the RH front door Furflex from the “B/C” post to the “A” post. It was glued in around the top, but was also tacked into the rubber tack strip on the lower half of the doors.

RH "A" Post Furflex

RH “A” Post Furflex

"A" Post Furflex

“A” Post Furflex

Sun Visors and Headliner

Removal of the Sun Visors was next. Each was held in place by three chrome finishing machine screws in a bracket (Friction Arm Assembly). The wood trim strip right below the visors: “Capping Above RH Side of Windscreen” was next on my list. The strip was held in place by three chrome finishing screws and cup washers, although mine was missing the cup washers. The Headliner is glued to the windscreen frame and wraps around flush to the glass. See image.

RH Sun Visor Removed

RH Sun Visor Removed

Visor Friction Arm Assembly

Visor Friction Arm Assembly

RH Sun Visor

RH Sun Visor

RH Windscreen Capping

RH Windscreen Capping

RH Windscreen Capping

RH Windscreen Capping

Wood Capping & Mirror Bracket

Wood Capping & Mirror Bracket

Headliner to the Windscreen

Headliner to the Windscreen

Headliner to the Windscreen

Headliner to the Windscreen

After gently pulling the headliner material away from the windscreen, I turned my attention to removing the hard rubber Tacking Strip that remained in the car. This is just not a fun task! I ended up cutting off the heads of the nails with my dremel tool, prying and pulling the rubber strip off of the nail, and then pulling our what remained of the nail with pliers. I labeled each piece of tack strip so that when it comes time to replace the strips I will have the originals to measure for proper fit.

Rear Door Tacking Strip

Rear Door Tacking Strip

LH Rear Door Tacking

LH Rear Door Tacking

Next was removing the furflex from the “B/C” post on the LH side of the car. It was just glued on until the lower door at about hinge height, where it was then also tacked onto the rubber tack strip.

Furflex Glued to "B/C" Post

Furflex Glued to “B/C” Post

Furflex Glued and Tacked

Furflex Glued and Tacked

Furlex Fit to Curve

Furlex Fit to Curve

Door Seals

I had not completely removed the exterior Door Seals when I had previously worked on the LH side of the car. So, I removed the LH rear door seals except for the piece at the hinge face. This is difficult to get to and should be installed BEFORE the door goes on after painting. I then removed the LH front door aluminum tread plate by loosening the four slotted sheet metal trim screws.

LH Read Door Seal

LH Read Door Seal

LH Front Door Tread

LH Front Door Tread

I then moved to the LH side of the interior and removed the LH front door capping assembly and the LH “A” post wood capping. As with the RH side, there was only one screw securing the “A” post capping, when the manual prescribes two. The LH sun visor and the rear view mirror mounting bracket were the next items for removal.

LH "A" Post Capping

LH “A” Post Capping

LH Front Door Capping

LH Front Door Capping

LH Sun Visor

LH Sun Visor

Rear View Mirror Bracket

Rear View Mirror Bracket

Underlayment

I think one of the principal sources of “Stinky’s” odor is the sound/heat deadening Jute Underlayment located throughout the interior of the car. Its removal was the next order of business. The end of the footboxes actually had two layers of insulation under the carpet. Under the insulation the entire flooring area was covered with tar paper – a common practice of the time.

Footrest Underlayment

Footrest Underlayment

Gearbox Underlayment

Gearbox Underlayment

LH Front Footwell

LH Front Footwell

Gearbox Cover

Gearbox Cover

Headlamp Dipper Switch

The Headlamp Dipper Switch was removed by loosening two long 10-32 machine screws with steel spacers. The switch has three terminals for wiring. The solid blue wire attaches to the terminal with an arrow head icon. The blue/red wire attaches to the “L” terminal, and the remaining terminal has two blue/white wires attached to it.

Dipper Switch

Dipper Switch

Scuttle Casing

The Scuttle Top Casing Assembly, or the vinyl covered aluminum panel below the steering wheel, was the next piece of interior trim to remove. To do so, I had to first remove the Radio Antenna Crank Handle. This was accomplished by loosening the screw in the top of the handle and then loosening the retaining nut. Trim ring nuts holding the stems for the trip meters also had to be removed. Finally, 3 chrome trim screws with cup washers had to be removed and then the panel was released.

Scuttle Top Casing

Scuttle Top Casing

Trip Mileage Adjuster

Trip Mileage Adjuster

Antenna Crank Handle

Antenna Crank Handle

Securing Nut

Securing Nut

 

Tar Paper and Seat Runners

Tackling the Tar Paper was the really fun job! If operating a heat gun in the confines of a car interior on a 93 degree day is your idea of fun. But after a lot of scraping with a putty knife I did get all of the tar paper removed. The very pleasant surprise was that the RH side floorboard was almost completely devoid of rust and the LH (driver’s) side had only surface rust – nothing that would require the replacement of floorboards! The images look much worse than the actual situation. While I have left the driver’s seat in place to make moving the car around easier, I went ahead and removed the RH Seat and its Seat Runner Assembly.

Tar Paper Insulation

Tar Paper Insulation

LH Floorboard

LH Floorboard

Seat Runner #6587

Seat Runner #6587

Seat Runner in Place

Seat Runner in Place

Seat Runner Both Sides

Seat Runner Both Sides

Seat Runner

Seat Runner

It was a successful weekend with the MK2! It is still slow going, but I made good progress and I have made very comprehensive notes and taken lots of photos (many more than what is posted here), that I am sure will help when I get to the reassembly process.

2 Responses to “Entry 12 – Door Seals, Trim and Wood”

  1. Nick Linney says:

    Hi,
    I don’t know when you posted this but a really helpful story. Thank you. I still have a query though. How do you remove the wood trim from the B post. I cant see any screws, I don’t think it prises off, I think it might slide down but don’t want force anything. Any tips gratefully appreciated. Thanks

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