Entry 18 – Bumpers, Bonnet, Engine, Radiator

Rear Bumper Assembly

Rear Bumper Assembly

Rear Bumper

I was looking forward to the continuation of dismantling “Stinky” this weekend as I would be finishing up the body trim with the removal of the rear bumper and would finally begin to address the engine compartment on the way to the engine removal. I discovered that either the previous owner or the owner’s painter got a little lazy with the bumpers. The front bumper was not secured to the center mounts and in the rear, the bumper was not fastened to the outside mounts. Go figure. I had observed that the tail lights had been broken and reinstalled and while the damage was minimal, upon dismantling it was clear that the bumper had also suffered a slight collision. I expect that I may find some body filler around the rear lights. We will see.

RH Rear Bumper Mounting

RH Rear Bumper Mounting

LH Rear Bumper Mountings

LH Rear Bumper Mountings

Rear Bumper Mount

Rear Bumper Mount

Bumper Mounting Bracket - Bent

Bumper Mounting Bracket – Bent

Bumper Mounting Bracket Straight

Bumper Mounting Bracket Straight

The car has four rear bumper mounts that are metal rings with rubber cushions. A 3/4” hex head bolt is used to connect the bumper bracket to the mount. The mounting bracket on the LH side was clearly bent as the photo shows.

Bonnet Hinge Assemblies

Bonnet Hinge at LH side

Bonnet Hinge at LH side

Bonnet Hinge at RH side

Bonnet Hinge at RH side

Bonnet Hinge Assemblies

Bonnet Hinge Assemblies

LH Bonnet Hinge Assembly

LH Bonnet Hinge Assembly

Next, it was time to remove the bonnet from the bonnet hinge assembly. Removing the bonnet would make it much easier to access everything in the engine bay. To help with refitting later, I cut a slight groove into both the LH and RH spring assembly brackets where the bonnet bolts to the bracket. I noticed that the washers on each of the four screws were different. The front bolt on the LH side had 3 washers and the rear just a lock washer. On the RH side the rear had no washer and the front bolt had one washer. I would like to think this was done to manage the alignment of the bonnet, but I guess it had more to do with lazy reassembly!

Bonnet Striker Pin Assembly

Bonnet Striker Pin Assembly

Bonnet Buffer 3/4"

Bonnet Buffer 3/4″

Bonnet Rubber Buffers

Bonnet Rubber Buffers

Bonnet Striker Pin 2"

Bonnet Striker Pin 2″

Bonnet Striker Pin and Latch

Before removing the bonnet, I first measured and then removed the bonnet striker pin assembly. The striker pin was 2 1/2” long from the base of the securing nut. The bottom cup was bent out of shape. There were also two rubber bonnet buffers fastened to the bonnet with nuts. The buffers measured 3/4” long from the bonnet base.

After removing the four 1/2” hex head bolts that fastened the bonnet hinge brackets to the bonnet, I lifted the bonnet away from the car. It was actually lighter than I expected it to be.

Bonnet Underside Striker Pin

Bonnet Underside Striker Pin

Bonnet Underside LH

Bonnet Underside LH

Bonnet Underside RH

Bonnet Underside RH

Bonnet Underside

Bonnet Underside

Engine

Finally, it was time to move to the first steps in the engine removal process! The first step was the removal of the ignition coil, its mounting bracket, and the condenser added for the radio. The black wire from the condenser joined the yellow wire and attached to the + terminal on the coil. The light blue wire from the distributor to the coil attached to the – terminal on the coil. The green wire with the black stripe was attached to what I believe to be a thermal sensor on the intake manifold. The ignition cable from the distributor to the coil was popped off the end of the coil. In addition to the upper nut on the bracket there was also a lower nut to be removed as seen in the photo.

Ignition Coil, Bracket and Condensor

Ignition Coil, Bracket and Condensor

black wire to thermo sensor

Black Wire to Thermo Sensor

Ignition Coil Lower Mounting

coil bracket

Ignition Coil Mounting

Ignition Coil Mounting

I then removed the air cleaner assembly. Loosening the large thumb screw on top of the air cleaner allows removal of the cover. The paper air filter – Hastings #AF127 – could then be removed. Evidence of the Jag’s little furry friends was found inside the air cleaner! The rubber seal that links together the air intake and the air cleaner assembly had been replaced with a wide black tape that was unwound and removed. The assembly could then be lifted off the large central locating screw. What appears to be a breather pipe and fitting is attached to the bottom of the air cleaner assembly. The hose connecting the pipe to the engine was disconnected and removed.

Air Cleaner Top Cover

Air Cleaner Top Cover

Air Cleaner Bottom Cover

Air Cleaner Bottom Cover

Air Cleaner Paper Element

Air Cleaner Paper Element

Air Cleaner Pipe Fitting

Air Cleaner Pipe Fitting

Rubber Sleeve

Rubber Sleeve

Air Cleaner Bottom Cover

Air Cleaner Bottom Cover

Air Cleaner Assembly

Air Cleaner Assembly

Next I disconnected the battery ground cable from the intake manifold and removed it from the car.

Radiator

Then the removal of the radiator was next on my list. I first drained the coolant from the radiator and also opened the water valve on the block. One can open the radiator petcock from up above in this Jag. No crawling under the car! Put a drain pan under the car and turn the handle on the coolant remote control rod. That is all there is to it.

Battery Ground Cable

Battery Ground Cable

Drain Tap Control Rod

Drain Tap Control Rod

Then I removed the top water hose by loosening the two hose clamps. The coolant overflow tank was next. I had already removed the tank from the body. I now only had to disconnect the overflowhose from the radiator and then removed the tape that was holding the tank’s overflow hose to theremote control rod.

Top Water Hose

Top Water Hose

Coolant Overflow Tank

Coolant Overflow Tank

I then cut the wire reinforced elbow hose from the lower side of the intake manifold and disconnected it from the radiator. I loosened the claim on the lower water hose and removed it from the radiator.

Elbow Hose

Elbow Hose

Lower Radiator Hose

Lower Radiator Hose

The Service Manual directs that the washer bottle should be removed next, but I had no washer bottle to remove? I will have to explore that more fully later.

Dynamo

Removal of the dynamo was next on my list. I first removed the wiring to the dynamo. One wire goes to the large spade, the other to the small one. A radio condenser also attaches to the large terminal. The Dynamo is held in place at four points, three of which are ears on the dynamo. The fourth is the connecting bolt to the block for the adjusting strap to create tension for the fan belt. I first removed the upper bolt that connected the adjusting strap. I then removed the long bolt at the other end of the strap that goes into the block. This allowed the dynamo to tilt to the side exposing the lower mounting bolts. These were then removed and the dynamo was lifted out of the car.

Dynamo Mounting Bolts

Dynamo Mounting Bolts

Dynamo Tension Bracket

Dynamo Tension Bracket

Dynamo Lower Mounting

Dynamo Lower Mounting

Dynamo Wiring

Dynamo Wiring

Dynamo Wiring

Dynamo Wiring

 

 

 

Dynamo Removed

Dynamo Removed

Next, I pulled the brake servo breather off its rubber tube to get it out of the way. The breather is located on the right front of the engine. Then I removed the breather tube bracket holding the tube to the radiator shroud. The bracket was held to the radiator through the shroud by a Wentworth nut.

bracket for Servo Breather

bracket for Servo Breather

Brake Servo Breather

Brake Servo Breather

Radiator Mounts

I then removed the two radiator upper mounting bolts securing the radiator to the car body.

Radiator Mount LH Top

Radiator Mount LH Top

Radiator Top Mount

Radiator Top Mount

Then I removed the two lower radiator mounting nuts.

Radiator Mount LH LowerRadiator Mount LH Lower

Radiator Mount LH Lower

Radiator Mount RH Lower

Radiator Mount RH Lower

I then removed the four nuts that secured the fan shroud to the radiator. It took some finese to work the fan shroud around the bottom water hose connector and the drain petcock, but I eventually got there without damage to the radiator. As the Service Manual states, it is best to shroud can then be pulled up and out as well.

Radiator Assembly Schematic

Radiator Assembly Schematic

Radiator Grille

I then removed the radiator grille from the car. It was held in place by five grille studs with

reinforcing angular washers – two placed vertically on each side and one at the bottom. Another nut/ stud can be accessed through an opening in the bodywork at the top of the grille.

Grille Center Vane

Grille Center Vane

Reinforcing Angle on Studs

Reinforcing Angle on Studs

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